Verb Tenses

-Levi Rennick-

A verb’s tense?Questions
What about a verb is tense?
Why don’t they just relax?
Do they need a shoulder massage or something?

A verb’s tense is not about stiff shoulders, or the verb needing to take 5, but is an attribute that tells us when the action took place.

There are many types of tenses, but the three common types of tenses, known as simple tenses:

Past tense – verbs that show actions that happened in the past

Eg. I created a blog post on verb tenses today.

Present tense – verbs that show actions that occur regularly or are always happening

Eg. I create a blog post on verb tenses.

Future tense – verbs that show actions that will occur in the future

Eg. I will create a blog post on verb tenses

There is also something called ‘perfect tense,’ which are formed with helping verbs like have, has, had, will, and shall. After the helping verbs, the past participles[1] of the verb are added on. Again, there are three perfect tenses:

Past perfect tense – actions that came directly before another action that happened in the past.

This uses has or have

Eg. We had played a game of chess in the lounge.

Present prefect tense – actions that were recently finished, or completed sometime in the past.

This uses had

Eg. We have played a game of chess in the lounge.

Future perfect tense – actions that will happen before other future actions occur.

This uses will have or shall have.

Eg. By tomorrow, we will have played a game of chess in the lounge

Table

Verb tense tips:

When writing about an idea or telling a story, you generally do not want to change what tense you are in (especially when in the middle of a paragraph), for consistency – tell your story from either the past, present, or future.

You can change tense, but make sure your reader knows that the story is now being told from a different time!

This is also not to say that you should never or can never change tense, it is just a general tip to make writing easier and possibly more concise.

Keeping the time of the action or actions in mind will help when trying to go for consistency within a story, and checking to make sure all the verb tenses correlate to the time frame of the story. Doing so will allow the reader to understand what is written to a better degree!

By using verb tenses properly, not only your writing will be more clear and smooth, but your speaking can be too! Telling stories does not only have to be in words, but when talking to friends or teachers, using proper verb tenses will allow them to have a decent understanding of what happened.

 

 

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